I’m a High School Student I’m a College Student

I’m a High School Student

If you think veterinary nursing is the right career for you, you don’t have to wait until college to get started. There are many things you can start doing right now to best prepare yourself for application to the College’s Veterinary Nursing Program. This includes taking certain courses in high school and seeking out certain professional and life experiences.

Academic Preparation

Becoming a veterinarian takes lots of academic preparation. This should include, but is not limited to, a strong math and science curriculum. Courses should include:

Mathematics

  • Algebra I
  • Algebra II
  • Trigonometry
  • Pre-calculus

Sciences

  • Biology – strongly recommend two years
  • Chemistry – minimum one year
  • Physics – minimum one year if high school offers it
  • Veterinary Science – if high school offers it

Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate

Professional and Life Experience

Any experience with animals is beneficial when pursuing a career in veterinary medicine. Future veterinary nursing students often start gaining animal-related experience as young as 10 or 12 years old. Experience with animals can come from a variety of sources including:

  • Sitting for pets
  • Showing animals
  • Owning, raising, or working with livestock
  • Participating in 4-H
  • Participating in wildlife projects
  • Volunteering at local animal shelters
  • Joining Future Farmers of America
  • Joining HOSA-Future Health Professionals

It is particularly beneficial to gain veterinary experience where possible as well. Do not wait until you start your college education to gain veterinary experience as it can be difficult to do so in addition to juggling a college workload and social life.

Ask local veterinarians and veterinary nurses if you may job shadow them and observe a day in the life of a veterinary nurse. Build a good working relationship with the veterinarian and veterinary nurse; it is important to start building professional relationships as you prepare for your career in veterinary medicine.

In addition to taking the right classes, and having the right professional exposure, gaining life skills and honing your own identity in the process is essential as well. Life skills include bettering your communication habits (both verbally and written), being a good team player, experience in leadership roles, as well as problem solving.

I’m a College Student

There are many things you can start doing right now to best prepare yourself for application to the College’s Veterinary Nursing Program. This includes taking certain courses and seeking out certain professional and life experiences.

Academic Preparation

To be considered for admission, an applicant must have a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.75 and a minimum of a 2.5 grade-point average of the last 12 credits completed and a minimum of a 2.0 grade in all prerequisite math and science courses.

Please view our Prerequisite page for more information.

Professional and Life Experiences

A minimum of 80 hours of veterinary-related experience is required to apply to our Program. Veterinary related experience is defined as any hours spent volunteering, observing, or working under the supervision of a veterinarian or a credentialed veterinary technician or veterinary nurse. The total number of hours and the quality of the hours will be considered when reviewing an applicant’s file.

In addition to taking the right classes, and having the right professional exposure, gaining life skills and honing your own identity in the process is essential as well. Life skills include bettering your communication habits (both verbally and written), being a good team player, experience in leadership roles, as well as problem solving.